D.h. Lawrence

“Never trust the artist. Trust the tale. ” Could anyone explain this better to me? I’m supposed to write a 250 word response on this, and yeah, i’m somewhat stuck. At 100 words. Today I found out that… Since D. H. Lawrence was a noted writer, let’s assume he was referring to the written word. The author will have a point of view he will tell the story from whether he is writing fiction or non-fiction. You will see that view reflected by his choice of wording and situations throughout the book. For non-fiction, you might afterward check his facts and find that he was completely incorrect in statements made throughout the book. An example would be a history book detailing the period leading up to and through the US Civil War. If that book were written by an author from New York, his version of the facts might differ greatly from that written by an author born and raised in Georgia. A more current example would be “An Inconvenient Truth” published by Al Gore soon after he left office. Those who believe in global warming embraced the book as a great guide to our future as citizens of the world. Those who don’t believe in global warming saw the book and the movie as pure fiction from a man not smart enough to figure out that his source of data was flawed. Lawrence simply meant it is better to become informed on a topic and then draw your own conclusions about a subject or the content of a book rather than to take everything literally and at face value. In other words, it’s only a story. It is not proof one way or the other.

Filmed during live performances for Blue Orange Arts. Directed by Tina Hofman. Adaptation by Roman de Fuscan. Live event filming and promotional video by Ian. . .