Upton Sinclair

This is one of my questions about 'The Jungle' by Upton Sinclair that I have to answers. I think I know what to say about fame, but not about "national office". I know almost nothing about politics and government and don't even know what this is. I tried searching but got many unhelpful results. Can you either please explain what they mean by "a failed run for national office" and what "national office" is, or even give me an answer? Thanks. What I found out was – Because The Jungle was about abuse of workers and citizens during the Great Depression when people were looking for alternatives to capitalism and socialism got a lot of attention. Sinclair was a socialist who wrote eloquently about the abuse and attracted a following for that reason. This was also a period of time when Unions gained a lot of influence, and of course, 'The Jungle' was a pretty strong reference point for Unions. In addition, The Jungle emphasized the plight of African Americans brought into Chicago from the south to bust the union strike, and afterwards, the imported southerners were fired and turned out onto the streets, which of course created a ghetto in the areas where they lived with no source of income, hence high crhyme rates, etc. Sinclair pointed this travesty out and doubtless gained a following for that-although now, decades later stuff like this has been largely forgotten and the ghettos are used by racists as an example of racial inferiority. It has been 40 years since I read that book so please forgive me if any of the details escape me, but it had a big influence on me. In the early 1980s, I worked in the 47th and Ashland area in Chicago for about a year and the experience was. . Well, poignant and then any as I saw the outcome of the exploitation and oppression Sinclair described.

Now available at last in first e-book edition, as well as a new print edition. When Upton Sinclair, famous author and lifetime Socialist, won the Democratic . . .